Filipina Who Crowdfunded Her Way To Worlds Wins Gold

 

ochoa

 

Filipina Who Crowdfunded Her Way To Worlds Wins Gold

 

Blue Belt Meggie Ochoa won gold in the Rooster category of the 2015 IBJJF World Jiu Jitsu Championships this past weekend.

 

The Atos Jiu Jitsu fighter was able to earn $4000 dollars for a plane ticket, registration and accommodations through crowdfunding. She didn’t use the major crowdfunding platforms (kickstarter, indiegogo, gofundme) but rather utilized, MAKEACHAMP.com to get the job done!

 

“I don’t know where to begin,” the athlete writes on Facebook. “It’s all still so surreal to me.

 

“Last year, this was all just a dream to me. I had no international competition experience, took a leap of faith, and crowdfunded my way to the world championships as a white belt through MAKEACHAMP.com. That marked the beginning of our shared journey.”

 

“With the ultimate goal of being a world champion at every belt level, I made a promise to keep the dream alive as long as I live and to share with you all the struggles and triumphs along the way.”

 

“Now, WE won the gold in 2 out of 5 belt levels! OUR hand was raised yesterday at the worlds as a blue belt!”

 

 

I don't even know where to begin!It's all still so surreal to me!First of all congratulations to all of our…

Posted by Meggie Ochoa on Saturday, May 30, 2015

 

 

 

It just goes to show that anything can be accomplished if you have the will, drive and determination! Congrats Meggie!

 

Pres. Barack Obama Gets His BJJ Blue Belt From Gracie Barra

 

obamabluebelt

 

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Pres. Barack Obama Gets His BJJ Blue Belt From Gracie Barra

 

Vladimir Putin is a well known Judo Practitioner.

 

 

President Obama, on the way out of the White House, and not wanting to be one-upped, has apparently been practicing Brazilian Jiu Jitsu under Gracie Barra! Check it out in the video below!

 

 


 

Dealing With Larger Opponents In Jiu Jitsu

 

largero

 

Dealing With Larger Opponents In Jiu Jitsu

 

The first time I ever did an Open division was when I was Purple Belt. I had won the Lightweight division and was facing the Heavyweight division champion. As the match began, joy filled my heart when my opponent pulled guard. I jumped over his guard almost immediately and my sense of elation grew. Wow. I’m so much faster than this guy. This is going to be easier than I thought.

 

This feeling was replaced by horror as he reached over my back, and pulled me over him, onto the bottom of side mount. At this point, the match became blurry. I must have gotten out of the side mount at one point, because I remember he jumped flying mount on me, and I recall thinking “holy s***, this guy is heavy” when I couldn’t shrimp out. The match ended a few seconds later with me getting submitted via armbar.

 

“Overcoming The Bench Press”

 

When I debriefed with my coach, I mentioned that I felt really demoralized after passing my opponent’s guard only to get rolled over with a ‘wrong’ technique.

 

He compared my situation during the match with the analogy of a 135lb bench press. Most adults can bench press 135lbs. But no one can bench press 135 for 7 minutes non stop (the length of a purple belt match). So mindset wise, you have to think of forcing your opponent to bench press you off each time and remember that with each rep, he is getting weaker.

 

“[Avoid] Harpooning the Whale”

 

The other analogy I like to use is that of harpooning a whale. The fishermen shoot a harpoon into the beast. The harpoon is attached to a barrel that can be dragged under the water. As the whale dives underwater, the added buoyancy fatigues him, eventually allowing the fisherman to complete the catch.

 

Same concept with a shark…

 

 

Don’t get stuck to your bigger opponent like a barrel!

 

After you pass, you have to “float” the guy until the right time. You have to disengage and make the bigger slower guy have to chase. Don’t clamp down and pin him until the moment is exactly right.

 

Here’s an example of the type of movement necessary for floating.

 

 

Passing the Guard…

 

When you say someone is bigger, you have to take into account both height and weight. A heavier shorter guy poses a different set of problems than a heavier taller guy.

 

Taller Guys are generally better at defending outside rotational passes. You have to stay close and try to control the inside space or the hips.

 

On Shorter Heavier Guys, techniques that move on the outside of the person will be more effective than head-on techniques.

 

From the Bottom…

 

Protect the Inside Space and force Outside attacks.

 

When the guard opens, you must protect the inside space so your leg doesn’t get pushed down right away. You should open while maintaining good pressure between your knees and turning your hips to the side. In other words, your opponent’s core should always be pinched between your legs. You should not absorb his pressure as a thigh-master.

 

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It’s often hard for beginners to learn how to defend the inside space with just their arms, which is why the closed guard (most often taught as the refuge against bigger and stronger guys) is hard for beginners to master.

 

Secondly, you will probably will find it easier to attack on the outside. Think Omoplatas, De La Riva, and spinning to the back, etc. All these positions keep you from being directly under your larger opponent.

 

High Knee-Shields and Spider Guards are good for when the person is on their knees. You have less movement to worry about since the opponent is on their knees. So your primary concern is to always maintain the right distance between yourself and your partner.

 

Long Term – Develop Takedowns!!!

 

For competitors, winning the open becomes much easier if you have good takedown ability. Not just because you can take your opponent down but because you maintain the ability to fatigue your opponent on the feet.

 

Example – Tye Murphy, one of the coaches here at Crazy 88, came in with zero takedown training – no wrestling, no judo. At the Blue Belt level, we would use a strategy of gripping for the first half of the match to burn out the big guys. Quite often, these big guys would switch gears and pull guard (sloppily) as they started to fatigue. As his judo and wrestling improved, Tye could now fight pure takedown matches, keeping his larger opponents out of their preferred position – top.

 

Specific wrestling and judo techniques also work better or worse against bigger opponents. Kouchi-gari and Stickers will be easier for you to execute earlier than Uchimata’s. Single Legs will generally be easier to get on larger opponent than Power Doubles.

 

So anyway, that’s my short primer on dealing with larger opponents. Hope that helps.

 

About Julius Park: I am a Jiu-Jitsu Black Belt. I’ve produced BJJ World Champions from Blue Belt up to Brown Belt. My next goal is to get a student to the Black Belt World Champion level and into the UFC. I have an English Bulldog, Ghostface, who has so far resisted all training methods. I teach out of Crazy 88 Mixed Martial Arts gyms in the Baltimore area.

 

juliuspark

Julius Park

 

Crazy 88 Mixed Martial Arts can be found on the Web, Facebook and Twitter.

 

Jiu Jitsu Reality Show “BJJ Library Challenge One – Ep. 2″

 

bjjreasl

 

Jiu Jitsu Reality Show “BJJ Library Challenge One – Ep. 2″

 

This is one of the best Jiu Jitsu videos I have seen in a while! It is a fun watch with a ton of great BJJ action. Saulo and Xande Ribeiro gather 6 dangerous Black Belts under one roof to fight for a chance to face Xande in competition.

 

 

In case you missed episode 1. Here it is again for you!

 

 

New BJJ Hacks Mini-Documentary On Dillon Danis

 

dilhacks

 

New BJJ Hacks Mini-Documentary On Dillon Danis

 

Here we have another great film by BJJ Hacks! The Hacks crew visits Marcelo Garcia’s academy in New York to hang out with Jiu Jitsu’s fastest rising star Dillon Danis! Not only is it a great interview, but there are some awesome techniques displayed during the filmed sparring sessions and even a cameo from the legend himself, Marcelo Garcia!

 

Enjoy!

 

 

How (And Why) To Tape Your Fingers For Jiu Jitsu

 

fingertape

 

How (And Why) To Tape Your Fingers For Jiu Jitsu

 

Brazilian Jiu Jitsu is the most fun thing in many of our lives. That fun can sometimes become associated with some pain and injury. That is simply the price that we all willingly pay on a daily basis.

 

Most common finger injuries can be treated with athletic tape so that you can continue rolling. A significant amount of these injuries can be prevented with a little bit of instruction.

 

Preventative finger taping can save you many months of pain. When your fingers are taped properly they can also give you some extra grip strength.

 

There are many reasons as to why someone should tape their fingers for Jiu Jitsu. Firstly, do you want your hands to look like the Miyao Brothers?

 

miyaohand

 

Finger injuries can take many months to heal. Our hands are as intrinsic to BJJ as our grips are. They are of tremendous import.

 

Check out some of the taping techniques in the videos below and let us know what you think!

 

 

 

 

 

I hope that this post helps you in your BJJ journey and saves you some finger wear and tear!

 

fingerjam

 

15 Tips And Strategies For White Belt Jiu-Jitsu Competitors

 

aadd

 

15 Tips And Strategies For White Belt Jiu-Jitsu Competitors

 

1. Decide whether you’re going to do takedowns or pull guard. If your standup strategy is a single technique like a “double-leg”, and you are unable to make it happen, just pull guard. If you started Jiu-Jitsu with takedown experience, make for yourself a set of parameters. For example, “If it’s halfway through the match and nothing has happened in terms of standup, I’ll pull guard to get the match going.”

 

2. Relax Relax Relax. What I mean by relax is to maintain a presence of mind.

 

3. There’s nothing wrong with being nervous. Don’t spend all your emotional energy fighting your own nervousness. Just accept it.

 

4. If it’s your first competition, remember that you only have to win each match once. In the training room, you can be lazy because you know there will be more rolling. You think, “Why burn up all my energy fighting this position now when I have another 30 minutes of rolling left?” This doesn’t apply to competitions. When competing you have to go full throttle each match from start to finish.

 

5. Most White Belts start strong. Few White Belts end strong.

 

6. I remember feeling extremely nervous watching competitors perform certain “advanced” techniques. For me, it was the flying armbar. I was deathly afraid of flying armbars – despite never having been flying armbarred. I’ve heard other people get nervous because they see someone do a Berimbolo or attacks feet a lot. Believe me when I say that styles make fights. You can have the fanciest, jitz-flow, surfer hand sign grappler look amazing in one match, and get completely shut down by a “boring” pressure oriented grappler the next.

 

7. Patches and stripes don’t mean a person is good.

 

8. Muscles don’t mean a person is good.

 

9. School affiliation doesn’t mean a person is good.

 

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10. You will experience time distortion. Everything might seem much faster (or slower) than it seems in the training room. Once you watch it on tape, you’ll realize the match was the same speed as training.

 

11. You don’t have to mean mug or be friends with everyone before the match. Do whatever makes you comfortable and don’t let your competition dictate your pre-match ritual. You don’t have to look people in the eyes (the “staredown”), perform the Catholic hand sign, or reenact Russell Crowe’s prebattle routine from Gladiator in order to win the match. Just do what makes you comfortable.

 

12. Put competition into context. The first time you step onto the mat, you’re just trying to get your nerves right. You’re not going to look like Bruno Malfacine out there. That’s ok.

 

13. You have to learn to compete as much as you have to learn Jiu-Jitsu. They are related but separate skills.

 

14. You don’t control winning or losing 100%. The referee and your opponent also play huge roles. That being said, the biggest variable that you control is yourself. Win or lose, keep your focus on what you could have done better.

 

15. Enjoy it.

 

About Julius Park: I am a Jiu-Jitsu Black Belt. I’ve produced BJJ World Champions from Blue Belt up to Brown Belt. My next goal is to get a student to the Black Belt World Champion level and into the UFC. I have an English Bulldog, Ghostface, who has so far resisted all training methods. I teach out of Crazy 88 Mixed Martial Arts gyms in the Baltimore area.

 

juliuspark

Julius Park

 

Crazy 88 Mixed Martial Arts can be found on the Web, Facebook and Twitter.