Why And How To Incorporate Wrestling Into Your BJJ Training – Firas Zahabi

 

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Why And How To Incorporate Wrestling Into Your BJJ Training – Firas Zahabi

 

This video is about How to incorporate Wrestling in BJJ. In my opinion BJJ and Wrestling should all be training in one room just like all the Wrestling programmes across the world. Blending both Jiu-Jitsu and Wrestling together leads to scrambles and sequences that we would others never have a chance to explore. Don’t miss out on adding this very interesting dimension to your game. – Firas Zahabi

 

 


 

Garry Tonon Ankle Lock Defense From 50/50, Plus Heel Hook Counter Attack

 

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Garry Tonon Ankle Lock Defense From 50/50, Plus Heel Hook Counter Attack

 

Garry Tonon shows some techniques and talks theories on how to defend an ankle lock from the 50/50 position. This video was made in 2016 after Garry’s May Seminar at Stout Training Pittsburgh – Team Renzo Gracie.

 

 


 

The Art of Flopping Over: The Epidemic Of Losing Base And Balance Among BJJ Practitioners

 

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The Art of Flopping Over: The Epidemic Of Losing Base And Balance Among BJJ Practitioners

 

Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu clearly isn’t known for its takedowns. But is intentionally taking the bottom position always the best option in grappling?

 

We all started training Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu to learn how to control the ground game. Wrestling, Judo and a slew of other grappling sports focus entirely on getting the other opponent down. But Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is so focused on ground fighting, that often practitioners will sacrifice balance and base as a trade-off for getting in a bottom position. While there is nothing wrong with “the bottom” strategically, sacrificing balance and base (herein: flopping over) is always a mistake.

 

But what is base?

 

Base or (Base of Support) is the area (width x height) of the bottom part of any upright structure.

 

area-web-e1472833873990
(Beating up people because of liking geometry and not the other way around.)

 

Since we presumably have mobile legs, we have to consider our legs position and ability to move from said positioning when calculating our approximate base.

 

Below are three classic examples of base that we often consider when doing takedowns and striking arts. Let’s see which scenario is ideal for base:

 

feet-web-e1472834041126

 

Clearly the middle foot positioning gives us both a wide enough step (but not too wide) and deep enough step (but not too deep).

 

And what exactly is balance?

 

Balance (in terms of fighting) is the ability to keep oneself upright, by a means of keeping your center of gravity within a central part of the base. This is no easy task while attempting to move yourself and another human being.

 

balance

 

So now that we understand what staying upright means in theory, how does that apply to grappling as a whole?

 

OK, I get the science of staying upright, but I still end up falling down.

 

Not to worry. Just like a white belt who doesn’t know the first thing about guard passing or sweeping, your takedown game probably only consists of submission attempts and those generally don’t help us stay upright. So, instead, let’s focus on some thing BJJ guys forget when standing:

 

Engaging on your terms

 

Don’t sit idly by while you are pushed or pulled in the initial phase of takedowns. The key to any good takedown (as is true in lots of grappling) is the set-up. Try to remain balanced and in good base when you get pushed or pulled. And when you have your footing, push and pull back!

 

 

Crossface, crossface, crossface!

 

If you don’t crossface when somebody is attempting a single (or even double) on you, your opponent will take you down all day long.

 

crossface

 

If you’re already doing BJJ and you don’t know what a crossface is, ask your instructor or learn about it on Youtube. It’s kind of a big deal.

 

Don’t Turtle!

 

Anyone who knows me I love the turtle guard. However, when I want to stay on top, it’s not the best place to be. Instead, if you find yourself in the turtle (from a failed shot or from being snapped down) you should diversify your turtle guard to learn a series of shoulder sweeps to sweep your opponent and come on top.

 


If you do turtle, turtle like Eduardo Telles.
 

NOTE: The classic log roll from turtle is one of SEVERAL moves and is by far the most predictable/easy to counter. If you only attempt it and just get pancaked, your turtle guard isn’t diverse enough to be called a guard.s

 

But what about base for BJJ, where we aren’t on our feet?

 

Good question. However, all of the above still applies for the ground game. Keeping that in mind, let’s cover some things we typically don’t remember when the fight hits the ground.

 

Use your head!

 

It’s good for thinking but the human head is even better for crushing! When it comes to grappling (standing or ont the ground), one of the most underrated appendages on the human body is the head.

 

If we think of all the tools we have at our disposal, we generally think about our hands, feet, maybe knees, but often neglect our good head positioning. (GIF credit to BJJScout)

 

BJJ_Scout_Demian_Maia_Study_Part_2_Movement_Mechanics_Concept_Reinterpretations

What did the head say to the face?

 

BJJ_Scout_Demian_Maia_Study_Part_3_Finishing_Sequences_Advanced_Recounters

SIT DOWN!

 

Don’t get overzealous with attacking

 

We’ve all been there. Your opponent is turtled or in the bottom of sprawl control and you get so excited to take his back or submit him and then you’re back where you started, on the bottom in some kind of guard. Some key points to remember in these moments:

 

– You don’t need to fall over when attacking the crucifix. It’s an even stronger position if you can lock it up with him still facing down, rather than having him lay on you.

 

– Underhooks prevent you from falling off the front when taking the back. We all love the seatbelt, but if you find yourself falling over the front of the guy’s turtle, you probably didn’t have a sufficient underhook. Switch to double underhooks if you feel this happening.

 

Don’t just attack the upper-body. The Truck is a great way to get your opponent worrying about his legs in a position where he’s mostly worried about his neck.

 

If we can stop from needlessly flopping over, we can use our guards to come on top and STAY there. Sweeping a guy 10 times in a match is cool, but wouldn’t you rather control him and submit him?

 

[This article was aggregated from SOURCE.]

 


 

4 Black Belt Tricks To Finish Armbars – Part 1

 

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4 Black Belt Tricks To Finish Armbars – Part 1

 

Learn the other 3 techniques at keenanonline.com

 

Learn the 4 tricks that top Black Belts use and abuse to finish their armbar attacks. I see even experienced grapplers making mistakes that cripple their ability to submit opponents. These 4 techniques will have you taking arms home like its your job. This is part 1 of a whole series specifically on dismantling someones ingrained defenses that everyone does to shut down arm attacks.

 

 


 

Relson Gracie Talks About His Father Helio Gracie, And Teaches A Counter To Knee On Belly

 

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Relson Gracie Talks About His Father Helio Gracie, And Teaches A Counter To Knee On Belly

 

This is a fantastic video! It is in Portuguese but there are English captions!

 

 


 

You’re Going To Lose In BJJ Tournaments, So Lose The Fear

 

chewjitsu

 

You’re Going To Lose In BJJ Tournaments, So Lose The Fear

 

When it comes to BJJ competitions there are very few guarantees. There are a few though. One fact or guarantee is that you’re going to lose. Yes, you’re guaranteed to lose in BJJ tournaments at some point or another.

 

Just saying that stings the ego a little doesn’t it? But it’s the truth. Even the superheroes of BJJ have lost matches. They may have not lost many but they’ve still lost.

 

This past weekend at the 2016 IBJJF Master Worlds. I scored a win against an opponent I had previously lost to. And I felt compelled to post not just my win, but also my loss against him.

 

While this goes against what my ego would like to do (it would be much easier to post just my win, and that be it). I think it’s important to highlight the fact that we all lose and when it comes to BJJ tournaments. Because if you lose it’s not the end of the world and it doesn’t mean you suck at BJJ, it just means you lost. Also, it’s not always who’s better at Brazilian Jiu-jitsu. Sometimes in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu competitions it’s about who plays the game the best.

 

So if you’re afraid of losing and that fear is keeping you from competing. Realize how silly that is. You’re being fearful of a forgone conclusion. You’re going to lose at some point. But there is also the chance that you can win and experience victory. But the only way you can do that is if you get out there and put yourself to the test.

 

No sense in fearing something that is bound to happen at some point or another right?

 

Instead, if you’re fearful of competing because of losing. Take all that energy and thought and put it towards how you can win.

 

So get out there and compete in BJJ if you want to. Don’t let fear stop you.

 

– Nick “Chewjitsu” Albin

 

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How To Improve Your Jiu-Jitsu By Committing To Your Techniques

 

capgr

 

How To Improve Your Jiu-Jitsu By Committing To Your Techniques

 

This is a long video that talks about commitment. It is over 6 minutes but I believe the story/analogy has value. If you are looking for a technique video this is not the video for you, if you are into deeper or more conceptual thinking in association with your training you may find some value in this video.

 

 


 

Very Important Side Control Escape Details [NEW]

 

sidecontrol

 

Very Important Side Control Escape Details [NEW]

 

In this video I demonstrate a series of techniques designed to make your opponent posture and thus regain guard.

 

Each of these techniques individually isnt high percentage, but the threat of these moves can illicit a lot of responses from your opponent that can set up escapes.

 

Having the ability to escape from Side Control all starts with having correct body positioning including your hands being in a safe place.

 

It’s important that these techniques fit well together against someone that likes to try and Cross Face and keep the hand by the hip. In the event that your opponent does get a Cross Face, controls with the hand over the body or grabs the pants near the knee, you will have to use a different set of escapes.

 

Besides the hand positioning I talk about the centerline and how to control in Side Control. Understanding what the person on top is going to do and what they are thinking will help you better understand the escapes as a comprehensive system to regain guard or gain the outcome of the individual techniques.

 

At any point, if they resist and take pressure off of you, that is your opportunity to slide a knee in, belly down or turn away.

 

With that being said, the hand that is controlling the tricep is very important. Most people that practice this try to dominate that hand solely with their arm. There is a combination of moving the hips into your opponent’s arm as well as pulling it into you that can be highly uncomfortable. If the person does not feel the need to move their hand from the floor by your hip then that means that your body positioning (specifically your hips) is off. Practice this until you get the pressure right.” – Great Grappling

 

 


 

How Can I Get Better At Escapes From Side Control And Mount

 

side

 

How Can I Get Better At Escapes From Side Control And Mount

 

I recently received a question from a BJJ White Belt. He asked how he can get better at escapes from side control and mount.

 

I’m pretty sure that this is the number 1 BJJ related question I get from white belts in the beginning. Because they lack the skills to be effective. They spend a lot of time in bad positions like side control and mount.

 

So in this video I give 4 tips that can a white belt in Brazilian jiu jitsu (or anyone really) can use to improve at escaping bad positions.

 

The tips are (starting with simplest to more in-depth):

 

-Learn to take a deep breath when you find yourself in bad positions during BJJ rolling.

 

-Focus on using the Brazilian Jiu-jitsu techniques you’ve learned rather than just pushing and shoving with no rhyme or reason.

 

-If open mat or extra free mat time is available. Had a partner attack you in your worst position.

 

-If time is not available or just another way to do it. Find someone you can beat and let them put you in the worst positions possible

 

As I share in this video. All of these tips have had a big impact on my game so I hope they help you as well if you’re struggling with escapes from side control and mount.

 

Thanks guys!
-Chewy

 

READ ALSO: 5 Ways To Escape Being Stuck In Side Control.