3 Easy Steps To Open The Closed Guard In BJJ

 

3 easy steps to open the closed guard in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu as instructed by Alain Pozo, BJJ Black Belt, renowned instructor and head coach of Fight City Gym / ZR Team Essex.

 

 

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Become Stronger Without Steroids In MMA And BJJ By Using Your Brain

 

Via David Avellan:

Everyone wants to become stronger and stronger these days, and with the widespread proliferation of performance enhancing “supplements,” it seems harder and harder to find honest athletes that aren’t cheating.

However, I will show you a way to get stronger without ever popping a pill or needle. You won’t even need to lift weights!

This one simple concept I call “Muscle Utilization” will change the way you apply force in fighting and allow you to become more efficient and feel stronger without putting on any mass.

 

 

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It Is Pointless To Start From The Knees, But If You Do Try This Move.

 

Many times when we spar Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu we will start the match from the knees. Generally speaking this is done to not waste time getting the match and to prevent potential injuries from the inexperienced doing takedowns on one another.

There is no combat situation that will start off in this manner. That being said, here is a great option (or trick) to pull off on your rolling partner if you are feeling fancy in your FUJI Suparaito Competition gi (which of course you can get for 15% off by clicking here).

 

 

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Too Cute! Check Out Kyra Gracie Teaching Her Daughters Jiu-Jitsu!

 

Kyra Gracie is one of only two Gracie women to achieve a black belt in BJJ and is the first Gracie female to actively compete in the sport.

She is a four time world champion and has been a long time ambassador for female grappling.

 

 

Two years ago she had her first child. She now has two.

The first gift Gracie children receive, is the gi.

Via Kyra Gracie:

“I’ve learned Jiu-Jitsu playing around with my family doing our Gracie games. This is the way I teach my kids and they love it. In 2018 I will open my own academy in Rio de Janeiro to teach all the secrets from my family to yours.”

 

 

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[New] 10 Common BJJ Mistakes That You Must Avoid!

 

BJJ Checkmat black belt Thiago Rodrigues cover 10 common grappling mistakes that you must avoid, to avoid submissions, sweeps, and weak positions.

 

 

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3 Powerful Tips To Sharpen Your Jiu-Jitsu Skills

 

by Mark Munster

PRACTICE MAKES HABITS

Rolling is one of the most exciting forms learning in the academy. It accelerates your ability to learn. How? All of the stimulus involved with the dynamics of JiuJitsu come to bear whether you train for Self-Defense, or for Sport.

One of the many vast benefits of Jiu-Jitsu is the ability to develop problem-solving skills. You deal with very real problems (e.g., someone is trying to strangle you, submit you, or put you in a bad spot you need to defend). If you survive and even turn the tables, you will have exercised the willpower, patience, and determination to withstand or even turn the tables into your favor.

Those are tools for the real world that are pretty powerful. Sharpened and effective tools only get developed with practice so that the habits can be developed.

My instructor, Mike Moses of Evolve Academy, has trained martial arts for most of his life. (Note: He has an awesome story you can listen to here [http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/graciejiujitsurockspodcast/gracie-jiu-jitsu-rocks/e/gjjr-ep-55-mike-moses-interview-46534058]).

One of his former training instructors and mentors is Greg Nelson. Greg Nelson is one of the most highly regarded coaches and trainers in MMA and Jiu-Jitsu having trained former UFC Lightweight champion Sean Sherk as well as former UFC Heavyweight champion Brock Lesnar.

From my first class to now, the phrase “Practice Makes Habits” is used to describe the mindset needed to develop accurate and habitual traits on the mat. Practice does NOT make perfect if you do not practice with accuracy and meaning. For example, if you practice shadow boxing with a loose punching style and little intent, you will be developing habits that may not be best suited for actual combat. Grapplers, when you drill your shrimping and bridging by yourself or when you coast through warm-ups, are you doing it half-assed, or with purpose? If you don’t drill with purpose, you’re losing out on hours of valuable and accurate skill development.

I highly recommend reading Greg Nelson’s post about the topic of Practice Making Habits. It puts this entire concept into focus, which is the foundation for this article.

3 WAYS TO DEVELOP BETTER HABITS

There are hundreds of techniques in Jiu-Jitsu and numerous variations of those techniques putting the possible combination of techniques into the thousands. Too many to develop complete mastery over, but we will always try to strive for more. It’s human nature.

It can be overwhelming to even know where to start when you are on the mat. I’ve covered 7 Highly Effective Habits for Newbs to review, but they span across all levels of practitioner. Sharpening a few, simple things first will give you a way to target each training session with short-term, and long-term goals. Let’s get into it.

1. Develop Strategies & Systems. The “strategy”, in the case of grappling competitions (also depending on the rules of such tournaments), is to take the match where you are most comfortable and have “game”.

Live grappling and training scenarios are your opportunity to test your strategy and push the activity into your “system”.

“Systems” refer to the position(s) with which you can execute your game plan over your opponent the best. Why? Because you have explored and refined the movements, movement responses, baits, feints, and techniques into a cohesive unit that moves your chances for victory closer to reality; in other words, from check to checkmate.

It can also be a Self-Defense scenario. Everything starts on the feet. If you want to get your opponent into your “System” and comfort zone in order to work your highest percentage techniques, how do you plan to do that? Here are some ideas.

What are a few of the more well known systems? Perhaps the Rubber Guard and the Danaher Death Squad Leg Lock System. They don’t need to be as elaborate, but you get the idea. Chain your techniques into a system to move towards end-game.

Footwork – you need to be comfortable with any activity on the feet, but if you can get your footwork down to minimize your mistakes or maximize your opponents mistakes, you can steer the activity to your strongest footwork and gripping combination, do it. With Self-Defense, having an aggressor close the distance to where you can manage the gap with activity to close and clinch is vital.

Grips – We hear the term a lot when we start. We think it means just grabbing and holding onto our opponent. There is so much strategy in gripping worth its own article or video series. Spend time watching high level judo players like Travis Stevens and Jimmy Pedro. This is a great video that explains beginning your strategy with your grips. I highly recommend any video by these two gentlemen as they have refined the art of the takedown.

Body positioning and angles – Similar to footwork, you can often get your opponent to react to what you give them. Like bait, if you position yourself to take away options for your opponent, they will typically go in the direction you want them to go (i.e., take the bait). Once they bite, you pull them into your first system.

Give them nothing – Close your Gi. Tight. And get your sleeves under control. If you don’t give anything to grab, or make them reach for it, you get first stab at initiating the action which gets into the next tip. The picture below shows it all. By the time you reach for that collar or sleeve, you will likely be bundled up and getting submitted.

2. Don’t Hesitate. One of the things that plagues the blue belt and sometimes the purple belts I train with, is that they hesitate when they have a favorable position. Here’s an example. A trainee obtains “chinstrap control” (which can lead to Guillotine choke attempts, passing the guard if stuck in butterfly or half guard, or taking the back), but they back off the position or even let go.

Often though, if the technique does not lead to anything. The reason it doesn’t lead to the next move is because the trainee has not developed the weapon to a degree of confidence with which to act upon and take advantage towards advancing the hold to a favorable, dominant position or a submission attempt. This is where we need to spend time developing “chains” of movements to form a “do-loop” that runs until we get the engagement into our “system”. Once we are in the system, “turn it on” until we get to game over.

So don’t be afraid to take chances and work towards refining your entry point moves to improve your chances. Worse case? You end up in a disadvantaged position and need to survive, defend, or escape. Take your medicine, you’ll be glad you did. But you’ll also think twice about hesitating next time.

3. Test Your Limits.

If we practice with purpose to develop better training habits, we will perform better when it counts. Sometimes, that means taking your training to an uncomfortable level. Uncomfortable is a relative term, as what is hard for some trainees may be a warm-up for others. Watch this video from Marcelo Garcia as he demonstrates this concept very well.

There you have it. Three simple adjustments you can make to your training to get more out of it. When you train with purpose and focus, you will improve your Grappling Return On Investment (ROI).

The article’s author Mark Munster is about to open his own academy in Maryland on September 5th, 2017! Find out more at www.poolesvilleselfdefense.com or their Facebook page.

 

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Advice For Those Who Feel They Aren’t Being Promoted In BJJ

 

Brazilian Jiu Jitsu isn’t unlike a lot of ventures in the aspect that no one sets out to do it to be average. Sure, the path to greatness is a tough road to hoe–and you’re most likely years behind in rank and experience to the competitors your age. But that doesn’t mean that your Jiu Jitsu Journey is irrelevant, or that you shouldn’t pursue your aspirations to be great. When you’re first starting out it feels like you’re not improving, not learning, and just overall not getting better. It’s hard to gauge yourself that way, but there are some tips and tricks that are out there to help. The most obvious way to tell how good you are–or how good anyone is–is their belt rank.

As you know by now: everyone starts off as a White Belt. As illustrated above, you’ll note the belt order (which is always correct), and the estimated time frames at that belt (which isn’t always correct). Traditionally, the recipe stripes based on time served on the mats with a dash of noticeable improvement and, maybe, some extra effort awards for doing things for your school/BJJ community—such as higher ranks volunteering to referee tournaments, fill in to teach classes, etc. But regardless of all of that, your promotion is at the discretion of your instructor.

That doesn’t mean you can’t do something about it, though. As a matter of fact, you should be doing something to encourage your promotion(s). By that I mean doing something more than just showing up to class. While I do understand that not everyone can be as committed to BJJ as the next guy, that shouldn’t be an excuse to not try to improve and push yourself. You may want to consider training/drilling with higher ranked partners so that you’re forcing yourself to train at a higher level. (ProTip: Clear it with that person before class & ask for help. It’s impolite for a lower rank to impose those kinds of situations on a higher rank.) Another fun way to put yourself out there is to compete in tournaments. Generally speaking, your instructor would love to see you take the risk and demonstrate what you know all for the sake of the art that they (and you) love–and they’re fun!

As much as it sucks, you can even be doing all of that and still not be getting the promotion that you feel you deserve and that you’re owed. Hang around long enough and you’ll see it in your gym. There are guys out there who preform way beyond their rank and yet are stuck in this rut of not getting promoted. Let’s be clear, there is no simple explanation for that. But I do think that it’s obvious that there’s a disconnect between you and the powers that be that can award you that next strip of medical tape for your stripe, or new belt. Under no circumstances should you directly ask your instructor for your promotion. *Read that last sentence out loud 5 times.* But there are ways to finding out what it is that you may need to do, or what they’re looking for out of you to get you to that next level. Some helpful tips can be:

-Asking another instructor at your school, not the head, what you can do to get better
-Start attending more classes [Many schools have classes by difficulty level, turn up the heat]
-Pushing a little harder during class. Meaning no slacking on warm-ups, drills, and yes, going a little harder during rolls.
-Compete in local, and maybe not-so-local, tournaments. Finishing high proves things to everyone. Even if you feel you’re better than that rank, show ’em, prove
it, seek & destroy.

 

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BJJ Fundamentals | Focus on Fundamentals, NOT Escapes

 

Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is an art that is structured around attaining dominant position in a fight, and then having multiple options to finish the fight if the need arises.

If you find yourself needing to escape too often, it could be that you are doing something fundamentally wrong that is putting you too frequently into bad position.

In the video below, Coach John Frankl continues his lesson on BJJ fundamentals; teaching what a grappler should focus on when the roll goes south.

 

 

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NerdJitsu Reviews Fuji’s Suparaito Competition Gi

 

For the record I work for Fuji but the reviewer does not.

That caveat being mentioned, on with the review!

Suparaito, which means Super Lite in Japanese, is part of FUJI’s SUMMIT product line which is designed for the serious competitor. The Suparaito gi features a very light pearl weave jacket with a rip stop collar with extra rows of stitching, and rip stop pants. Suparaito is IBJJF approved and comes in White with Navy and Blue with Green.

Special Features:
Lightweight pearl weave jacket
Triple reinforced rip stop pants
Stiff collar with extra rows of stitching
Bungee cord drawstring
Contrast stitching
Available in sizes A0-A6

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