Why Jiu-Jitsu Can Be Your Best Therapy

 

5 X World Champion Bernardo Faria explains why he believes that Jiu-Jitsu can be the best therapy for anyone who practices. Those of us who do BJJ regularly know exactly what he is talking about.

 

 

GET A BRAND NEW FUJI GI FOR $79.00! CLICK HERE!

 

Would you like to write for wbbjj.com? Message us using the chat bubble on the right!

 

3 Reasons Jiu-Jitsu Players Don’t Use The Closed Guard

 

by Teddy Drimonis
mightycuddles.com

 

When I first started playing Jiu-Jitsu, I had a very difficult time putting my opponents into my closed guard. Keeping them there was cake, but getting them there was nearly impossible.

 

This bothered the heck out of me, of course. So I asked my professor what I could do to improve, and his response to me was, “The guys here are very good at staying out of closed guard.” This wasn’t helpful at all, nor was it any kind of answer to my questions. I was clearly on my own in this regard.

 

Or maybe not. When I think about it, very few people I trained with, or train with now, look to close their guard. This is for a number of reasons.

 

The first reason is the most obvious: Trying to pull someone into your closed guard is like trying to drag a cat into a shower. And when you do manage to succeed, and your opponent escapes soon after, you feel defeated. Closed guard is hard work, and is looked at by many players as more trouble than it’s worth.

 

The second reason you don’t see much closed guard, is that you almost always have to open your guard to advance your position and/or submit your opponent. Opening your guard leaves opportunity for escape, so your technique and timing have to be sharp when your legs open. If you don’t have a killer lapel choke, you may be looking for an alternative guard.

 

The last reason I’ll mention may be the most important. The berimbolo! That’s right. You cannot berimbolo from closed guard. Not Miyao, and not ever (see what I did there?). But really, the closed guard may be the least dynamic of all the guards available. And all of the visually appealing submissions and sweeps come from other positions, which leads many Jiu-Jitsu players to view the closed guard as antiquated.

 

Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu was built around the closed guard. I still think it’s the strongest position in the sport and should be the first position nurtured by all new players, if for no other reason than for the ease of its mechanics. But as listed above, there are plenty of reasons to just leave the thing open.

 

GET A BRAND NEW FUJI GI FOR $79.00! CLICK HERE!

 

Would you like to write for wbbjj.com? Message us using the chat bubble on the right!

 

Feeling Down About Jiu-Jitsu?

 

Do you have the “blue belt blues”, or any other Jiu-Jitsu related depression? Check out the video below and afterward subscribe to his channel. He puts out great advice daily!

 

 

GET A BRAND NEW FUJI GI FOR $79.00! CLICK HERE!

 

Would you like to write for wbbjj.com? Message us using the chat bubble on the right!

 

How To Not Get Injured While Training BJJ

 

by Daniel, The Dad Blogger
http://thedadblogger.co.uk/
Instagram
Twitter

 

Friday night, an hour into class and a few rolls into sparring, I catch a knee to the ribs. It was enough to knock the wind out of me so I stopped right there but, given a few seconds to recover, I decided to jump back in. Everything was ok. Next morning, I thought it was a little tender but nothing to worry about.

 

So I show up at Wednesday’s class and chose a partner to run through some drills. This guy was heavy. Not the fat round type, this is a guy who plays the pressure game and, through superb technique, can have you shrimping or hip bumping but going nowhere until you either tap out or pass out. Side control was the starting position for the drill and as soon as weight was placed upon my chest I heard, and felt, a “crumph” from inside my chest cavity. It was painful but I only had an hour class and I had driven all the way and I pay my fees, blah blah, so I was going to continue. Bad idea. I got home and with ice, heat and Ibuprofen I still struggled to move. Breathing was labored and I didn’t have full movement on that side of my upper body. Sneezing felt like an axe to the ribs.

 

There are some tips to avoid common injuries. Properly warming up is essential. Run through rolls, hip escapes, backwards rollovers and so on and, even when the sparring starts, ease into it slowly. There is a lot to be said for building stamina and conditioning. Resistance training and yoga are great ways to ensure you have a stronger more flexible body. As four times Jiu-Jitsu world champion Bernardo Faria said, “It’s better to train for 12 months at 90% effort than 3 months at 100 or 110%!”.

 

I have no idea what happened to me. Maybe it was a fracture or maybe some small muscles or ligaments were torn. Either way, I’m out of BJJ for few days or maybe weeks. I’m not a young man and it will take me longer than the younger dudes at the club to recover. So the lesson here is not to train when you are injured. What seems like a small thing will become a big thing the more you ignore it. Rest up and look forward, patiently, to your next class.

 

 


Daniel The Dad Blogger

 

GET A BRAND NEW FUJI GI FOR $79.00! CLICK HERE!

 

Would you like to write for wbbjj.com? Message us using the chat bubble on the right!

 

It Happened To Me. Why Every Woman Needs To Learn Jiu-Jitsu.

 

By Taylor O’Mara

 

After more than 10 years of dealing with the triggers, flashbacks, haunting memories, and lack of trust I believe I am finally defeating it; I am defeating being a victim of rape. I am learning to become a survivor of it. I started practicing Jiu Jitsu about 8 months ago and that’s where everything changed.

 

I started training Jiu Jitsu because my child started in it. I didn’t start it for the self-defense aspect of it. A couple weeks ago I was faced with a huge flashback. We were drilling the “rape choke” and just the name of it caused a trigger. I am typically able to overcome the small triggers without an issue. A lot of Jiu Jitsu causes triggers for me. Once we started drilling it over and over again, I kept going back to it all happening again. It was playing on repeat in my head. Even though going through the flashback was really difficult, there was a positive part with it. I learned how to defend myself from that position.

 

A couple days after this happened, I overheard a conversation after class. A younger girl was asked if her dad made her start Jiu Jitsu or if she wanted to. She said it was both, but her dad wanted her to know some self-defense before she started dating any boys. I was only a year older than her when I was attacked. I wish I knew back then what I know now.

 

I have read opinions from people that say Jiu Jitsu is not going to help you defend yourself. It’s an opinion not a fact. In all three of the incidents I faced, Jiu Jitsu would of helped me tremendously. When I was pinned down in a truck by his weight, the only thing I could think of was to keep my knees up to protect myself. I didn’t know then that by wrapping my legs around him I would have more control. I did not know that I could of choked him with his own shirt. I probably wouldn’t of been fighting for as long as I did.

 

If someone believes that they can’t be a victim of rape, you are wrong. It can happen and it happened to me. What happened when I was younger was traumatic, but I think the reality of all of it sank in when I was assaulted as an adult. I was in the comfort of my own office, where I felt safe. However, I learned I was not safe and should have been more aware after my co-worker of a couple years started acting strangely. He tried to keep me cornered by my desk but I got up and walked away. He decided to follow me and start forcing himself on me. I said no a hundred times but he never listened. I knew what was happening then and once I realized he pushed me into the wall with the rape choke. I had no idea of what to do but yell and yell as loud as I could. I knew no one could hear me because I was alone, but that firm voice got him to stop and walk out.

 

It has been 5 years since that happened and 2 years ago I received a letter from him. A letter apologizing for what he did and telling me he did it because he felt like he could have anything he wanted. I do not believe he is truly sorry and I will not let my guard down because an attacker apologized. I will only learn more ways to defend myself from it ever happening again.

 

I know most women carry guns now to defend themselves. However, will your daughter have one on her if it happens to her? In my situation, as an adult, it would of been in another room, nowhere near where it happened. I have to learn to defend myself with my own body in case I don’t have another weapon of choice. You might not have one on you, either, when it happens. It really can happen anywhere. I cannot stress that enough. I thought it would of never happened and it did. I was wrong.

 

Jiu Jitsu is not the only self-defense out there to learn. There are all types of things out there to learn. I think it is great to take advantage of everything you can. You can attend seminars for women’s self-defense but consistency and practice are the keys. Practicing a technique only ten times is not going to allow you to do it without having to think.

 

Only a couple of people know about what has happened. I’m not one to speak about it. However, I hope that it can help someone else. Maybe it will help another woman in my situation of dealing with being a survivor of rape. Maybe it will get more women into training so they can have the self-defense training to protect themselves.

 

 

GET A BRAND NEW FUJI GI FOR $79.00! CLICK HERE!

 

Would you like to write for wbbjj.com? Message us using the chat bubble on the right!

 

Thank You Moms For Helping Us With Our Jiu-Jitsu!

 

by Brooke George
brookebjj.wordpress.com
Instagram
Twitter

 

The name Mom has many titles. Caregiver, friend, nurse, cook, and supporter are just a few. Moms have a tough job. Jiu-Jitsu moms have an even tougher job. From driving back and fourth to the gym multiple times a week, preparing food for tournaments, taking pictures at testings, and most importantly supporting her favorite athlete through all the anxiety and nervousness. Although she is not on the mats with me (yet), my mom has been a huge support in my Jiu-Jitsu journey.

 

So Mom, here’s to you and all of the other Jiu-Jitsu moms out there…

 

First off, thank you. Thank you for letting me be in this sport and for letting me find a passion that I wouldn’t have without you. Although you were scared of me getting hurt and scared of the unknown that came with this new sport, you let me try it and you let me fall in love.

 

Thank you for your time. You have invested about as much time into this sport as I have. You have spent countless hours at the gym with me waiting for me to finish class. You’ve sacrificed Saturday’s so I could train more, and you have sacrificed entire weekends to go and watch me compete. Time is something you can never get back and I appreciate all of the time you have spent with me, with and without Jiu-Jitsu.

 

Thank you for your support. You have supported me from day one. Whether it was asking about class and listening to me speak Jiu-jitsu for hours back when you didn’t understand and even now when you’ve heard it non stop for over a year, you continue to listen. You also support my weird food requests. Even when I add organic mac n cheese, an insane amount of bananas, and acai to the grocery list, you continue to buy it for me. You are also there for every tournament. You haven’t missed a match even though it makes you extremely nervous and you find it hard to watch sometimes. You are still standing by the barriers cheering me on.

 

Thank you for your money. Jiu-Jitsu isn’t cheap! As a high schooler I wouldn’t be able to afford the gym fees, tournament fees, and lets be honest, the multiple gis I probably don’t need, even with a job. Without your financial support I would’t be able to train, so thank you!

 

Mom, without you I wouldn’t exist and I also wouldn’t be able to succeed in Jiu-Jitsu. Thank you for everything you have done for me on and off the mats!

 

 

 

GET A BRAND NEW FUJI GI FOR $79.00! CLICK HERE!

 

Would you like to write for wbbjj.com? Message us using the chat bubble on the right!

 

BJJ Tournament: Sometimes You Have Good Days, Sometimes You Have Bad Days

 

 

BJJ Tournament: Sometimes You Have Good Days, Sometimes You Have Bad Days

 

www.bernardofaria.com

 

“Bernardo Faria is a 5x World Champion. Bernardo started training Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu in Juiz de Fora – MG, Brazil at the age of 14 in 2001. After receiving the Black Belt from his first instructor Ricardo Marques in 2008, He moved to Sao Paulo to join BJJ legend Fabio Gurgel and his Alliance team. After many years of training and winning many major titles, Bernardo moved to NYC in 2013 to train and teach at Marcelo Garcia Academy. In 2015 Bernardo achieved his dream of winning the IBJJF World Championship Open class title and his division, doing the double Gold and becoming the 1st in the IBJJF Ranking and also choosed as the best athlete of 2015.

 

Bernardo Faria has now taken on the mission to share some of the lessons, techniques, experiences and more that he has learned along in his 16 years and counting as a BJJ student, teacher and world class competitor.

 

Subscribe to his channel, and join him in this amazing BJJ Journey. We promise that you will also improve your BJJ with his awesome Video Lessons, Episodes of his “5 Minutes BJJ Talk” and more…”

 

GET A BRAND NEW FUJI GI FOR $79.00! CLICK HERE!

 

Would you like to write for wbbjj.com? Message us using the chat bubble on the right!

 

The Top 5 Reasons To Start Taking Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Classes

 

by Brooke George
brookebjj.wordpress.com
Instagram
Twitter

 

It’s hard to know when or if you should join a new activity, especially when its something that isn’t very ordinary. Although Jiu-Jitsu isn’t common, here are my top 5 reasons why you should join.

 

1. Self Defense

 

Many people have claimed that Jiu-Jitsu is one of the best forms of self defense for women. As a women practitioner, I agree. The things I have learned from training in Jiu- Jitsu that could help me in a situation where I need to defend myself are priceless. Even just a little bit of training can make your self defense game that much stronger.

 

2. Exercise

 

BJJ is amazing exercise! It is very different than any other workout too. It’s great cardio and great strength training. Jiu-Jitsu uses and trains different muscles than your everyday exercises. I sometimes leave class with muscles being sore that I didn’t even know I had.

 

3. Confidence

 

Being able to toss, choke, and break a full sized adult can be a confidence booster. It definitely has been for me. Through my BJJ journey I have become much more confident thanks to this sport. I am confident with my body with knowing how strong I really am and seeing all the potential it has and I am much more confident in who I am.

 

4. It’s Fun

 

You don’t want to do something unless it’s fun. Jiu-Jitsu is fun. Going to class quickly became my favorite activity. On top of weekly classes there is also the tournaments that are a blast!

 

5. You Join A Family

 

Joining the Jiu-Jitsu community is joining one giant, worldwide family. Your teammates will quickly become family due to all the time you spend at the gym. Not just that, but you automatically have a connection with someone when you hear them say they do BJJ.

 

From self defense to a second family, those are just some of the reasons to join Jiu-Jitsu. This incredible martial art has so much to offer everyone that joins. If you know someone who would benefit from Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu than share this article with them!

 

 

 

GET A BRAND NEW FUJI GI FOR $79.00! CLICK HERE!

 

Would you like to write for wbbjj.com? Message us using the chat bubble on the right!

 

What happens at a Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu (BJJ) class?

 

by Daniel, The Dad Blogger
http://thedadblogger.co.uk/
Instagram
Twitter

 

I’ve been asked a number of times about what happens at a Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu (BJJ) class. I thought I could provide a quick summary of what I’ve learned so far.

 

Show up early. When you get there early, you can assist in getting the space ready for the class. For us, this means rolling out and positioning the mats. It’s also a great time to get to know the other club members.

 

Don’t come late or the instructor can refuse to let you take the class or enforce a penalty, such as a number of pushups, situps or both. Not only is this about showing respect for your instructor and classmates, it’s also about getting you warmed up in the shortest amount of time as you may have missed some or all of the class warm up.

 

When everyone has their kit on we are ready to get started. The typical format, as far as I can see it, is:

 

1. Warm up

 

2. Teaching with demonstrations

 

3. Light (flow) rolling

 

4. Scenario sparring

 

5. Sparring

 

6. Cool down and stretch

 

In item 2, the instructor will select a peer of similar height and weight and talk through a particular technique. Whilst demonstrating it, you can ask questions. Once the technique has been sufficiently covered the instructor counts 1,2,3 and everybody claps in time. This signifies the end of the demonstration and at this point, you partner up again with someone that’s the same height and weight and get to try it out for yourself.

 

While practicing the technique with your partner, the instructor will walk the room offering help, answering further questions and perhaps demonstrating again if he feels that there is an issue with a part of the technique that most students have missed.

 

Depending on time, items 3 and 4 may be left out. But I like 3 and 4. Flow rolling means that you are essentially leading each other through guard passing and techniques that need to be rehearsed. Don’t resist movement. It’s a flowing continuous spar. If a submission is available, show by demonstration that you could have exploited it but make the point physically and get back into the flow.

 

Scenario sparing, in item 4, is where the instructor calls out a position to start from and the students find a partner and assume this position, for example, back or side control. When the timer starts the student in guard needs to pass or escape the position he is in before the other student can move from guard to submission.

 

You should be well and truly warmed up by now. Both physically and mentally. The move to sparring for a white belt is hard. This is where your technique is really tested. Rather than just slowly walking through exercises, you now have to compete against your classmate who is also trying to complete one of the techniques he or she knows. This is exhausting. The work rate is upped and at a low belt level, drains your energy. The key lesson here is how to preserve your energy. A very important skill for the BJJ practitioner.

 

Once time is up, then instructor calls everyone to line up in rows and the cool down begins. This consists of stretches and yoga poses to loosen up strained muscles and get your body temperature down. It is essential to slow your heart rate before leaving the room. Once this is complete, there may be club announcements and then it’s the circular walk of the mat to bow, shake hands or man hug everyone in the class as a mark of respect for your classmates.

 

Go home and enjoy the endorphins!

 

This post is based on my fifth lesson at Mathouse BJJ in Reading. A Roger Gracie Academy.

 

 


Daniel The Dad Blogger

 

GET A BRAND NEW FUJI GI FOR $79.00! CLICK HERE!

 

Would you like to write for wbbjj.com? Message us using the chat bubble on the right!