Crazy Ninja Choke Submission At The Good Fight

 

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Christian Banghart finished one of his matches at The Good Fight tournament this past weekend with a crazy Ninja Choke! After taking his opponent down and grabbing side control, Christian uses his mouth to bait his lapel across his opponent’s neck and then spins into North-South position to gain the tap! So Awesome!

 

 

Check out this other recent quick finish of his below.

 

 

Thanks Christian for sending us these videos! Keep up the great work and keep us informed of your progression! OSS!

 

This New Choke Is Seriously Nasty!

 

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For this week’s #TechniqueTuesday check out this insane choke by Mike Bidwell of BJJafter40.com! This choke works like a Baseball Bat Choke except without the gi.

 

Mike dubbed this the “GI JOE With KUNG FU GRIP Choke” because of the manner in which you place your hands in order to perform the maneuver. G.I. JOE toys from the 70’s and 80’s were notorious for possessing this patented grip.

 

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Check out Mr. Bidwell demonstrating the technique below!

 

 

Below is an instructional on how to perform this technique!

 

 

Mike Bidwell is a BJJ Black belt by day and aspiring Ninja by night.  Mike is a Black Belt under Ken Kronenberg (Team Tai-Kai / Balance).  Mike competes regularly in the masters divisions and also runs the popular www.BJJAfter40.com website.  In addition, Mike’s 8-year old daughter Valencia runs the www.TheGiProject.com website where she collects and sends new and used gi’s to “at risk” and underprivileged kids throughout the world so they can participate in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu.

 

“An EMS Worker’s Jiu Jitsu Journey” – by Bob Ross

 

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(Photo Courtesy of Bob Ross)

 

“An EMS Worker’s Jiu Jitsu Journey”

by Bob Ross

 

Why oh why did I have to get bitten by the Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu bug so hard? It’s not as if there’s nothing else to do. I love to fish for crying out loud and I do have friends outside of the gym. Sometimes they try to get me to try my hand at golf and sometimes that doesn’t sound so bad. I hear that’s good exercise too and I’m quite sure the scenery is nicer. But no I politely decline, extend another invitation to come check out a class and go collect my gi.

 

The question in my mind is why? I’m not a world class competitor and I never will be. Even considering the few local tournaments I’ve competed in, my record could only be considered perhaps average, at best. I’m no Gracie by any means. I’m a 37 year old respiratory therapist with stiff shoulders and a questionable right knee. There are times even now as a (I think) well accepted member of my team that I find myself wondering what the hell I’m doing there. Well I’m hoping to answer that question for myself and hopefully I’ll be able to strike a ring of truth with a few of you as well. After all, though we all started at different times in different places for different reasons, we’re all on the same journey now.

 

These days I hardly ever talk about Jiu-Jitsu outside of the gym unless someone else brings it up. Has anyone else noticed the myriad of responses you get when someone finds out you practice BJJ for the first time? It can range anywhere from genuine interest (or feigned interest at least as often) to ridicule, to some dude automatically assuming you consider yourself a badass. That last one is my favorite. It’s actually quite comical to me when people think I consider myself a tough guy. I know you will understand when I tell you there is no more humbling experience than the first time you square up with a guy (or in many cases, worse: a female) half your size and get absolutely taken to school. I think that might actually be the unofficial lesson #1 of BJJ: You are not a badass. Coincidentally, lesson #2 is that you never will be. But if you stick around long enough and suffer through enough maulings, eventually you’ll be able to hold your own to some degree. Not because you got tougher on the outside but because you were tough enough on the inside to go home, nurse the wounds of your bruised ego and still come back to endure it again. And again. And again.

 

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(Photo Courtesy of Bob Ross)

 

I wasn’t athletic in my younger years by the way. Not that it matters, just some background about myself: I’ve never considered myself a jock. As a matter of fact in high school I was the burnout that hated jocks. That’s ok though, were cool now. You’re some tough dudes. I like tough people, sissies have always disgusted me.

 

Pretty early out of high school I became a Paramedic. Emergency Medical Services was a career that at best gave me twice the pain and frustration that it did satisfaction.  Along with that came extensive and continuing education, fierce periods of physical exertion and an intense feeling of camaraderie. Is this starting to sound familiar? Physically and mentally I could no longer handle that job. Not to get overly dramatic but quite literally, I believe it was killing me. Once while I was getting off duty I had a dizzy spell so bad I asked my partner to sit with me while we waited for my blood pressure to come down just so I could walk across the parking lot to my car, much less drive home. Call me weak if you want but the national average of an EMS career is about 5 years. I lasted damn near 15. With the kind of stress that comes with that job comes intense periods of anxiety that sometimes can only be relieved by interacting with others going through similar experiences. With that comes a bond. It’s a bond that can’t possibly be formed with anyone else on earth because no one else will ever get it.

 

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(Photo Courtesy of Bob Ross)

 

In EMS there is a constant struggle. Between disgustingly low pay , incompetent managers, some hopeless coworkers and quite a few patients that really aren’t sick, just refuse to care for  themselves (much less walk their own fat asses down the stairs) eventually you become the picture of the stroke victim you’re expected to save. Throw in a real person, really dying here and there and you can see where this is one of those things that reading about it just isn’t enough. You can never know it until you’ve lived it. That’s where your friends come in. Sometimes you wind up drinking and laughing with a guy you thought you hated just a few hours ago just because of a shared experience and people who should be close to you become outsiders. They just haven’t been there; no one else gets the struggle. That’s a strange place to be: when your loved ones become strangers, not due to any fault of their own but because they can’t even fathom the demons in your head, much less help you cope with them. In short, at one time not all that long ago my head became a very dark and strange place to be.

 

So where does Jiu-Jitsu tie into all this? I can’t do EMS anymore. It’s too much both physically and mentally and the pressure was threatening to break me.  Let me say that I am very fortunate to have moved on to other areas of the medical field and am very thankful to have met some very high caliber people there too. But something’s missing and it has been ever since I traded my medic badge for hospital scrubs. I truly love what I do now and I love the people I do it with but there was a bond in EMS that just isn’t able to be replicated. I intensely missed being accepted by a group of people all from totally different backgrounds yet united by a common goal. Where was the camaraderie? Where was the brother (and sister) hood? What about the strange need to feel the world closing in around you? The feelings of intense pressure and impending doom that I had learned to thrive on? I never expected to miss that aspect of my life but apparently after so many years, it had become my home.

 

Jiu-Jitsu. That’s where Jiu-jitsu comes in for me. EMS fulfilled me in ways I can never fully explain except to those who have had their hands in the same blood that I did; but at the same time it was constantly trying to kill me, to make me another body on the pile. Jiu-Jitsu challenges me in very similar but in much healthier ways. Believe it or not there are quite a few similarities as well. Problem solving in real time for instance. I have to think on my feet (or on my back as the case may be). When I was a new medic and started getting nervous, sometimes I would have to consciously slow my breathing in order to not panic and retain the ability to effectively care for my patient. I have to focus on my breathing now too. Sometimes it’s from exhaustion, sometimes it’s the weight of one of my larger sparring partners “making waffles” as one of them likes to say. Other times it’s the weight of my sensei’s brutal knee on belly pressure. The point is that it’s an absolute necessity for me. Another absolute necessity that crosses lines is the ability to solve problems in real time while the world is seemingly crashing around you. I think one of the primary reasons I love our art so much is the sense of pressure, the feeling that the world is closing fast and you need to keep your head, not panic and decide a way out. Now.  Notice I didn’t say think of a way out. There’s no time for that bullshit when a 260 lb monster is threatening a kimura, you just better move your ass. The same went on the streets: bad scene, blood, lights and the sounds of sirens, diesel engines, incoming helicopters and screaming family members. All the while you have a patient trying to meet their maker. Don’t think. Move. Your movements had better be automatic. What was it Saulo Ribeiro said?  “If you think you are late. If you’re late, you muscle. If you muscle you tire. If you tire, you die.” Or someone else dies… same-same.

 

I’ve found other similarities in Jiu-Jitsu that mirror unwritten rules we had back then in EMS. I’m sure some of these will sound familiar:

 

Look out for each other.

 

Work together and not against each other.

 

Your ego is your enemy; a little humility goes a long way.

 

Always be ready to listen and learn.

 

Be willing to teach but only when the time is right.

 

Speaking of teaching I guess that’s another missing link BJJ has recently filled for me. I loved teaching new medics. As much as I wanted out of EMS at that time, I found sincere satisfaction working with the newbies right up until the end. I don’t mean instructing in a classroom either (I tried instructing CPR classes once. Let’s not talk about how that went, ok?) No, I mean real-world, hands on teaching. That I could actually do effectively. Toward the end of my EMS career it was one of the few things I had left that actually let me not hate being there. It’s funny to me that I never really even realized I missed the teaching aspect of the whole thing until the first time I was asked to run a Jiu-Jitsu class. I can’t claim to be the best to learn from, and by no means do I consider myself anything but a student. However teaching that class made me remember that there had been some things about the job back then that I didn’t completely despise.

 

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(Photo Courtesy of Bob Ross)

 

So that’s where BJJ ties into my life. It fills a void. Or at least that’s how it works in my train-wrecked mind. I’m not a huge guy nor do I consider my ground game to be stellar. I’m in ok shape but I’m not naturally athletic. I have to work hard at it and that’s ok because it’s not about being the swiftest guy on the mat. As a matter of fact it’s not about you at all, cupcake and it never was. At the end of the day it’s just about showing up, if not for yourself then for your partners. That guy struggling to breathe because your knee is digging into his sternum, you’re there for him. Push him harder. The guy working his ass off to catch you in that choke, you’re there for him, dig deeper. Work your ass off and make him earn that tap. Because rule number one is simple: You don’t bail on your partner. Not ever.

 

 

-Bob Ross

Kevin Casey out of Metamoris 5, $10,000 if you can defeat Vinny

 

A dismal turn of events that can hopefully be turned into something epic

 

According to Ralek Gracie, Founder of Metamoris Pro, “King” Kevin Casey will not be facing Vinny Magalhaes on November 22nd. This was just stated on the MMA Hour Podcast with Ariel Hewani.

 

This news breaks shortly after the Countdown video for the match up was released.

 

 

This tweet from Metamoris makes it official:

 

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We will keep you posted as more details unfold.

 

Fabricio Werdum Chokes Out Drilling Partner

 

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The newly crowned UFC Interim Heavyweight Champion is a force to be reckoned with in the octagon or on the mats. At 6’5″ and 232 lbs the champ can put you to sleep before you have time to tap! In this demonstration video his “uke” takes a quick nap while the cameras are rolling.

 

Fabricio Werdum is a 2nd Degree Black Belt in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu under Octavio “Ratinho” Couto. He is also the first person to defeat MMA legend Fedor Emelianenko. He did so with this very triangle. It is dangerous technique in the right hands for sure.

 

 

This IBJJF Referee Did Not Get The Memo!

 

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It seems as though someone forgot to remind this IBJJF referee that the “Estima Footlock” is now legal at all belt levels. This is because it is a straight ankle lock variation.

 

Check out the IBFFJ rules here.

 

What do you think after watching the video? Did the DQ’d gentleman attack a heel hook, or was it a legal technique?

 

 

“The Four Pillars of a BJJ White Belt” by Mike Bidwell

 

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(Photo Credit: Richard Mossotti)

 

“The Four Pillars of a BJJ White Belt”

by Mike Bidwell

 

Everyone starts at white belt but quickly forgets exactly how that feels.  It’s an amazing time where every class brings new information and what seems like a constant stream of “ah ha” moments.  Along with all the excitement comes endless frustration and confusion.  Why is BJJ so challenging at the beginning levels?  Part of it is that Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is just a tough martial art: physically and mentally.  It’s not like other martial arts where you can sort of trick yourself into thinking you are better than you really are.  Here’s a good example:  If two adults take a striking class they will hit pads, throw kicks and punches in the air and maybe even spar with a partner.  (In most cases, people don’t spar 100%.)  Why because of injuries, safety concerns, etc.  But in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu you can actually “spar” or grapple at 100%.  Why?  Because the “tap” gives you the “out” when you need it.  In other words, you can grapple your partner at 100% effort and resistance and when you get into “trouble” you can tap and exit the match safely.  If you were doing standup sparring at 100% the only real measurement of absolute success is an actual knock out.  Now of course you can spar 100% and see what happens…but that probably isn’t the safest way to train!  So my point here is that BJJ gives you instant, 100% feedback.  You grapple someone and they catch you in a submission and you tap out.  Immediately you know that you lost.  There’s no question or debate or “what if” scenarios…you lost period!

 

When you are a white belt you will more than likely tap out way more than you will ever tap out others.  For the most part this is as it should be.  If you’ve never wrestled or grappled before your expectation shouldn’t be that you would be good right away.  Nobody is ever good at anything at first.  Have you ever tried snowboarding?  You will spend more time on your ass than a Miyao brother (I actually like them a lot that’s a compliment really).  Snowboarding like BJJ, it is very difficult at first.  Like most things in life, you have to suck at it before you can be pretty good and you have to be pretty good before you are good… and so on it goes.  In order to progress on your journey in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu you will need to build a solid base early on in your training if you are to survive.   In this blog I will cover what I believe are four pillars that are vital to a beginner BJJ student.

 

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(Photo Credit: Richard Mossotti)

 

Pillar I:  Tell your narrative and stay committed to it.

Why are you starting Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu and what do you expect to get out of it?  These are very important questions that will act as your guide and beacon throughout your first year of training.  Your narrative is your story.  What do you want your story to look like?  Sit down with a notebook and write (in the present tense) what you expect to gain from your first year of training.  Start it like this…”Now that I’ve been training BJJ for one year I have lost thirty pounds, got two stripes on my white belt, competed in my first tournament…” This will help you clarify your goals and objectives regarding your training.  Take your time and be as specific and detailed as possible.   Why one year?  You can’t start BJJ thinking that you might quit.  Make a commitment with yourself that no matter what you will stick with it for one year!  This gives you time to create real momentum.  Remember, unless you’re seriously sick or injured, you have to stay committed to your original goal to train for a minimum of one year.

 

Pillar #2:  Have an accountability partner

Not knowing anyone in your BJJ class can be very intimidating and for some people a path to quitting.  Your accountability partner can be anyone who you train with that helps you adhere to your goals… and you do the same for them.  How do you find an accountability partner?  It can be something as simple as recruiting a friend or family member to attend class with or maybe you befriend someone from class. Having someone to share your BJJ excitement with is very important.  It gives you someone to train with outside of class, someone to share rides with and most importantly someone to help you stay committed to your goals.  If you can get your significant other to train with you then kudos!  That alone will prevent future arguments over your “insane addiction” to BJJ!

 

Pillar #3:  Take copious notes

Go and buy a notebook for your BJJ notes.  Bring your notebook to class with you and take notes during class.  By taking notes you will extend your attention span, recall information more effectively later, and allows you to be a more active learner.  If you were taking a college course taught by an important speaker you would take notes right?  BJJ isn’t cheap and you are learning one of the most complicated martial arts on the planet from someone who is an expert…why wouldn’t you take notes?  In addition to taking notes in class it is also important to take notes after randori (live sparring).  Ask yourself two important questions:  What did I do right? And what did I do wrong?  This will help you set goals and benchmarks.  In addition, take specific notes on specific partners.  Your grappling partners are your truest benchmarks.  Write down how you think you did?  What is working and what’s not working?  This will help you mark your progress and record your first year of training.  Which will also be valuable later on in your training when you look back and reflect on your time as a beginner.

 

Pillar #4:  Ask for help!

Remember, your instructors are there to be your guide.  You have to always trust that they have your best interests in mind.  Don’t be afraid to ask questions.  Also don’t be afraid to trust their judgment! You never ask; “when am I getting my next stripe?” Let your instructor be your instructor.  Other than that, your instructors are more than happy to answer your questions.  Of course don’t take advantage of their time. If you have a lot of questions or just need some help with your training, schedule a private lesson.  Private lessons are a great way to get some extra guidance from your teacher.  If you cannot afford private lessons, ask some of the upper belts in your school.  Most decent blue belts can answer most “white belt” questions.  Blue belts are also great because they just spent a great deal of time not too long ago as a white belt.  Take advantage of this excellent resource.

 

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(Photo Credit: Richard Mossotti)

 

Additional Tips:

  • The more you train, the more you’ll get out of it! You can either “dip your toes” or “jump in headfirst”.  BJJ is a very complicated martial art.  You will never “get it” by training once a week.  Make a commitment to train a minimum of 2-3 times per week.  Like the saying goes, the more you put in the more you get out of it!  How deep down the rabbit hole do you want to go?

 

  • If you’re over 40 or coming off an injury etc. Be smart with your training partners.  Don’t grapple with the crazy 20-year old that tries to rip everyone’s head off!  If you’re attending an open mat then pick safe, trusted partners you feel comfortable with.   You’ll quickly figure out who the crazy ones are and who are the safest students.  Don’t be afraid to ask the upper belts to grapple with you (especially brown and black belts).

 

  • Attend Open Mat. Don’t be afraid to attend open mats.  Some of your most valuable lessons will take place in live training.  Plus this is where you will develop and hone your grappling skills, improve your cardio and really experience the most exciting part of BJJ training!

 

Check out this crazy technique video from Mike!

 

Mike Bidwell is a BJJ Black belt by day and aspiring Ninja by night.  Mike is a Black Belt under Ken Kronenberg (Team Tai-Kai / Balance).  Mike competes regularly in the masters divisions and also runs the popular www.BJJAfter40.com website.  In addition, Mike’s 8-year old daughter Valencia runs the www.TheGiProject.com website where she collects and sends new and used gi’s to “at risk” and underprivileged kids throughout the world so they can participate in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu.