15yr Old Grace Gundrum Assassinates Two Older Women

 

Grace “The Silent Assassin” Gundrum is 15 years old and faces two high level competitors at the Onnit Invitational 7 tournament.

10 min round
EBI rules

00:00 Onnit Academy in Austin, TX
00:28 Grace Gundrum warms up with coach JM Holland
01:15 Match 1
03:09 Match 2

 

 

Grace trains 10th planet Jiu-Jitsu under the tutelage of Eddie Bravo.

 

 

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How To Escape Side Control When You Have No Frames

 

A lot of newer BJJ players do not realize the importance of having frames when stuck in a bad situation. This video shows what do when you do not have those important frames while stuck in side control and both of your arms are out of position.

 

 

 

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Are You Scared To Shoot Takedowns?

 

“I’m a little hesitant on my shots. I hate getting extended in that position and putting myself at a disadvantage. Even if my attack connects, what do I do from there? I don’t know how they’re gonna react. What if my opponent counters with something I’ve never seen before and I give up points? Shooting also takes a lot of energy. What if I get tired? Oh well, guess I’ll just pull guard!”

If this sounds like you, then you’re not alone. This still happens in wrestling despite extensive amounts of takedown practice (except for the part where you pull guard, of course). In fact, it’s so common that you’ll occasionally hear this in Division 1 NCAA Wrestling where people are extremely cautious and hesitate to attack.

So, why is this a problem and how do you go about fixing it? Fear when shooting takedowns may stem from a variety of factors and it’s tricky in that there may not be a one-size-fits-all solution. If you address the following points, however, you should be in a good position to overcome these fears.

Technical Disconnect
The most obvious cause may be some form of technical disconnect between practice and competition. Maybe you’re not getting a good enough feel of the position because your partner is simply falling over when you try to execute a takedown. A little resistance (anywhere from, say, 20% to 50%) helps immensely in getting a feel for the takedown because it teaches you where to put more force or pressure into an attack when you’re met with resistance.

You might also simply misunderstand takedown principles, which is certainly possible. Some instructors talk about the techniques but not the reasoning as to why they work. Think of it as chess openings. At some point, you’re going to want to learn how the chess pieces relate to each other and why certain chess openings are more favorable in some areas than others. A takedown may seem complicated with many parts at first, but most of the time you can break it down into three parts: set up, shot, and finish. Often times, hesitation with shooting takedowns comes from not being sure how to finish a takedown after you successfully connect an attack. If need be, feel free to focus on drilling takedown finishes without the set up or the shot.

Uncertainty and a Lapse of Confidence
You may call it stage fright, performance anxiety, choking, or something else. Mark Cody, a division 1 NCAA wrestling coach, once said, “If you think, you’re in trouble.” One of his wrestlers had gone undefeated for the entire season leading up to the national tournament but started thinking about one particular opponent that he would inevitably face. It was his only loss of the season but it certainly cost him the 1st place finish.

Confidence is something that you can actively build up over time. Think of all the times you’ve successfully executed a takedown. Maybe this starts in the practice room; think of all the times you’ve practiced it, followed by all the times you were able to do it while sparring or during a live go. More effectively, you can think of all the times you’ve successfully taken someone down during competition. If you’ve got personal experiences in your mind of all the times you’ve taken down high level competitors in competition, you’re more than ready to attack.

Focusing on Getting Everything Just Right
During a practice session, you get to focus on every detail. In a competitive situation, however, that focus on every detail will slow you down and get you in trouble. Conscious thought can lead to hesitation, and that hesitation could be the split-second difference between a well timed shot or one that feels rigid and sluggish. If this is the case, you may often feel as if you’re “forcing” a takedown that’s not there. Make no mistake- it was there! By the time you decided to execute, however, it just wasn’t there anymore. At the beginner and intermediate levels, you may be able to get away with it. At the higher levels, those fractions of a second will matter.

Past a certain point of practice, you’ll realize that the technique has been integrated into your subconscious. You can do it with your eyes closed. You can do it without thinking. You can do it with seven seconds left in the match when you need to score the winning takedown to close out the match.

When you’ve got a solid understanding of the technique, have some sense of certainty in the positions you may end up in, and the confidence to execute, you’ve got yourself a go-to takedown. All that’s left to do is to clear your mind and let your body take care of the rest.

What is your go-to takedown and what steps can you take to improve it in practice and in competition?

Che is a former collegiate wrestler, member of Thailand’s national freestyle wrestling team, and current combat sport enthusiast. He writes about how to achieve higher physical and mental performance while being on a budget or a busy schedule. You can learn more about Che and his work at: https://chayoot.blog/welcome-to-chayoot-blog/

 

 

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Fundamental Postures When Passing The Guard

 

Posture is one of the first and most confusing elements that the BJJ beginner will face. Inevitably the first time you put a beginner in your closed guard they will raise their butt way up of of their heels and almost tip themselves over.

This video is so important for white belts because it gives the fundamental answers to this seemingly awkward position.

 

 

 

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Jordan Burroughs On Sacrifice And Rising From Defeat

Right off of his second loss of the day at the 2016 Olympic Games, Jordan Burroughs graciously agreed to an interview. As a fan of USA Wrestling, this interview was hard to watch. Burroughs definitely did not hold back any emotions, and we truly got to appreciate how much a high level competitor needed to sacrifice in order to be able to compete with the best.

Burroughs talks about how he let his family down and missed a lot of his children’s milestones to pursue wrestling. “I didn’t see my son walk for the first time. I’ve left my wife at home with two kids for long periods of time to go to training camps, to foreign countries. She did that joyfully, not begrudgingly, because she knew on days like these that I would perform. Now I feel like I let her down. I let her down. I let my family down. This was supposed to be my year. This is supposed to be my breakthrough performance that cemented me as a legend in the sport.” For context, the only two-time Olympic gold medalist in American wrestling history is John Smith.

In the interview, Burroughs goes on to talk about how hard he’s worked. Many combat sport practicioners can relate. “I’ve worked hard for four years, man. I’ve done everything right. I’ve spent time away from home. I’ve cut weight, I’ve ran, gotten up early. I sacrificed so much to get here, and I just wanted to show people that. I didn’t want anything from this but for people to understand wrestling’s cool. We work hard….I face the fans, the criticism, the backlash, the trolls. I’ve always made my goals public. The hard thing about being an Olympian is your failures are public, too. At some point, I’ll find out what I did wrong and learn a lesson from this.”

Rising From Defeat

Perhaps as inspiring as Burroughs’ owning up to his losses was his rise from defeat. After this heartbreaking day, Burroughs returned to his winning ways. Having had his technical strategy figured out by his opponents, his opponents also gained confidence knowing that Burroughs was vulnerable. At the World Cup, Burroughs won every one of his matches, but he didn’t win in typical dominant Burroughs fashion. Many of his matches were very close, and fans wondered where his signature double leg takedown was.

The doubt continued as Burroughs proceeded to beat everyone else on American soil, but had a few very close calls along the way. In the best-of-three world team trials finals to determine the US representative at 74 kilos for the World Championships, Burroughs lost the first match of three matches to long time rival and four-time Division 1 NCAA champion Kyle Dake. In round two, Burroughs trailed behind Dake. Commentators wondered if they would witness the first change in USA’s 74kg representative since 2011. In an inspiring performance, Burroughs found a way to win by scoring a takedown and back exposure on Dake, which put him in the lead. Dake tried to take the lead back in the closing seconds, but Burroughs defended the final scoring attempt with seconds left on the clock to force a third match. Finally, in the third match, Burroughs took the lead, kept it, and left no doubt that he would continue to represent the United States in freestyle wrestling.

At the World Championships, Burroughs practically reinvented himself as a champion in one of the most inspiring performances we’ve ever seen. He navigated a brutal bracket where almost every single one of his opponents had placed in the top five of the World Championships in previous years. His first opponent from Azerbaijan went on to win a bronze medal that year. His second opponent from Japan was a former world silver medalist. His third opponent from France finished in fifth place at a previous world championship. His fourth opponent of the day from Uzbekistan had beaten him at the 2016 Olympics and hadn’t given up a single point on the day until their match where Burroughs delivered a clutch performance to win by one point. In his final match of the day, Burroughs defeated a former world champion from 2014 in a back and forth match to take home the gold medal. At the end of it all, one thing was clear.

And You?

Success is never guaranteed in sport. Success will never be guaranteed in sport. Knowing that, are you still willing to make the sacrifices necessary in order to reach the highest levels of mastery in your craft?

If your answer is yes, then you are well on your way to making it much farther than the common practitioner in your sport.

What have you had to sacrifice to get to where you are today?

John Smith, the only two-time Olympic gold medalist in USA wrestling history, once talked about his sacrifices too. You can read about them here. [link]

Doing More With Less: Lessons Learned From 2X Olympic Gold Medalist John Smith

 

Che is a former collegiate wrestler, member of Thailand’s national freestyle wrestling team, and current combat sport enthusiast. He writes about how to achieve higher physical and mental performance while being on a budget or a busy schedule. You can learn more about Che and his work at: https://chayoot.blog/welcome-to-chayoot-blog/

 

 

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8 Ways To Shut Down Guard Pullers Easily

 

Here are 8 solid options for standing vs seated, whether this happened from a guard pull, standing to pass or any other reason. The seated guard allows for many options for sweep and submissions, so having some solid preemptive options for shutting this position down is important. See what you think!

 

 

 

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