How Many Times Per Week Should I Train Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu As A White Belt?

 

How Many Times Per Week Should I Train Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu As A White Belt?

 

How much you train BJJ will depend on how well you can balance your life, schedule your time, and how well your body holds up to the rigors of training.

 

Here is a guide to how often you should train per week:

 

Once – Progress will be slow, you won’t get in shape from BJJ alone, and classes will feel disconnected. This can be OK once you have experience and want to take it easy for a while.

 

Twice – You will gradually get better, but lessons will still be feel disconnected unless your school follows a good curriculum from week to week.

 

Three – Three times per week is a sweet spot for most people, giving them a chance to get in a steady rhythm of training while still having days off to rest and manage their normal life.

 

Four – This is where you start getting serious. You will need to be better disciplined with your rest and diet and managing the rest of your life, but it will be very rewarding for your BJJ.

 

Five or more – You’re getting serious! You can expect to improve quickly, but you also need to be very careful about overtraining and getting injured. This is what you need to be doing if you want to compete and earn your belts quickly.

 

If you are young and have no real responsibilities, make everyone else jealous by training as much as you can! Don’t slack in the rest of your life, and go to college and get that big job or whatever your long term goals are, but don’t miss the chance to train a lot while you are young, healthy and carefree!

 

For the rest of us bitter responsible adults, you’ll need to plan around work and family duties. You may get friction from your spouse if you disappear to the BJJ gym every night, but I’ll leave it to you to sort out your marital disputes.

 

I recommend beginners aim at 2-3 classes per week until your body can handle it, then try to push up into 3-5.

 

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BJJ Legend Rodolfo Vieira Wins His MMA Debut!

 

BJJ Legend Rodolfo Vieira Wins His MMA Debut!

 

World class jiu-jitsu black belt, ADCC and IBJJF World champion Rodolfo Vieira made quick work of his MMA debut on Saturday February 12, with a first round submission win over Zarylbek Daniyar of Kyrgyzstan.

 

Fighting on an MMA event called Arzalat in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Vieira appeared in the main event versus the 1-1 Kyrgyz fighter.

 

Working behind a jab, Vieira felt out the opening minutes of the round before hitting a lightning-quick takedown near the fence. A few slick transitions from knee-ride to mount gave him positional dominance. Some soft strikes forced Daniyar to turn, exposing the fighting-ending rear naked choke at 2.27.

 

Cornered by his original jiu-jitsu coach Julio Cesar Pereira of GF Team and his head MMA coach Ricardo Liborio of American Top Team, Vieira looked comfortable and confident in his first outing in the ring.

 

 

 

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How Can I Learn Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Faster?

 

How Can I Learn Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Faster?

 

Train more!

 

Training more is always the best answer, but here are 10 more tips to help you learn BJJ faster:

 

1. Keep a journal – Write down what you learned in class. Even if you never read it again, the act of gathering your thoughts and visualizing the move as you put it on paper will help you retain the knowledge.

 

2. Watch instructionals – The BJJ instructional market is huge now, and these days you can find videos by top instructors teaching almost anything. Pick a technique, position, guard, or gameplan, then go study it. You’ll still need to drill it–watching isn’t the same as doing!

 

3. Study competition footage – YouTube has hours and hours of high level tournament footage, and more live events are being streamed on-demand. Find a good match and see if you can breakdown the key moves. Many black belts say they learn more from watching matches than from what’s taught in class.

 

4. Find a BJJ role model – Pick a black belt with a similar body and game to yours, then study their instructionals and tournament footage. You don’t need to reinvent all of grappling–you just need to find what works for you, and odds are someone out there can show you.

 

5. Compete in a tournament – Win or lose, competing will teach you a lot (maybe even more if you lose!). Your training leading up to the tournament will sharpen your jiu-jitsu as you refine your best moves and cut out what’s unneeded.

 

6. Create a gameplan – Having a bunch of moves you “know about” is useless if you aren’t any good at them. Laying down what you do–maybe by drawing out a flowchart of positions and techniques–will solidify that knowledge and show you where you’re missing pieces. Then go drill it!

 

7. Do extra conditioning – A healthier, stronger, faster body is always good for BJJ. How you do it is up to you: lifting weights, swinging kettlebells, jogging, running, bike riding, swimming, yoga, rock climbing–whatever gets you sweating!

 

8. Team up with a good training partner – Make friends at the gym who will show up early and stay late to put in extra reps and rounds. Having an enthusiastic friend will keep you motivated, and you will push each other to improve.

 

9. Set goals – Big or small, setting goals will let you channel your energy in the right directions. Go into each class with something you want to improve. But don’t get so obsessed with the goal (like getting a blue belt!) that you stop enjoying the journey!

 

10. Respect your body – Eat right and get enough sleep. You can’t expect your body to stand up to the stress of training without giving it the nutrition and rest it needs to repair itself.

 

But really, train more! None of this advice does anything if you aren’t stepping on to the mats!

 

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To Those Who Lose Their First Jiu-Jitsu Competition

 

To Those Who Lose Their First Jiu-Jitsu Competition

 

Every Saturday the Jiu-Jitsu competitor sees their timeline loaded with the thrilling victories that occur that day. Rarely do you get a glimpse into the agonizing defeats. We don’t share our ugly photos over Social Media (unless that’s all you can make haha) and we aren’t keen to sharing our defeated moments to the world. We like to present our “best foot” for the most part.

 

For every match won in BJJ, someone else had to lose that match.

 

If you were one of the ones who did not win your matches, the world is not over. Not only is it not over but you should feel as if a whole new world has opened for you! You have broken through the initial competition fears and anxieties and have thrown yourself onto the mats for the world to see, either coming home with your shield, or on it. You have done what many in our sport have not done and will never do!

 

There are many attitudes that you can take moving forward. You can be depressed and down on yourself, or you can take away the memories and the fun time and walk away with a wealth of experience that you would not have had otherwise. The real trick is to not make excuses for yourself. Don’t tell yourself that the only reason that you lost is because the other person cut more weight, was bigger, stronger, better looking, or anything like that. Simply tell yourself that you are going to go back into the gym, talk with your coaches about your mistakes, and build a stronger plan for the next time.

 

Your second competition will be so much easier for you than the first. The time will come where you feel the thrill of victory and all of the accolades that come along with it so do not stress for now. Simply commit yourself to work harder next time.

 


 

Garry Tonon Faces AJ Agazarm In The Gi, TONIGHT!

 

Garry Tonon Faces AJ Agazarm In The Gi, TONIGHT!

 

Fight to Win Pro 24 features a series of submission-only all-star matches! Last minute changes have seen the card amended to include three incredible headlining matches:

 

In the main event AJ Agazarm will take on Garry Tonon in what we expect to be a very heated match! Even more intriguing is the fact that these two top black belts will square off in the gi!

 

Joao Assis will defend the heavyweight title against Atos scrapper Mike Perez, an ADCC Trials winner and World Championships veteran.

 

Rounding out the main card is Edwin Najmi of Gracie Barra, taking on Nathan Mendelsohn to determine who will become the welterweight black belt (gi) champion.

 

Check it out here! ==> http://www.flograppling.com/event/254406-fight-to-win-pro-24

 

 


 

Holy Smokes This Is A Great Body Triangle Counter!

 

Holy Smokes This Is A Great Body Triangle Counter!

 

This is a move that I have held onto forever and rarely show anyone! WHY? Well it’s a funny story but years ago when I was a purple belt teaching BJJ a blue belt came to my class visiting from out of state. After class we grappled and I got his back and threw on my signature body triangle. Within a few seconds I was astounded when I was forced to tap to a foot lock! Immediately I was like, “what just happened?!” He showed me how he caught me and I never forgot that move. Over the years I rarely ever shared this simple little counter submission. WHY? Everytime…and I mean every time I show someone this move I inadvertantly get submitted with it. So for as lone as I can remember I never have showed it…let alone put it on video for the world!!! So here it is at last…. By the way, why am I putting it out now? Because it (like all “my” Jiu-Jitsu) was never for me to keep in the first place… Jiu-Jitsu is meant to be shared. OSS! – Mike Bidwell